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Means of travel to place of work (2001 specifications) by Place of usual residence (Workplace population) (Workplace Zones in England and Wales) 2011

Dataset population: Workplace population aged 16 and over in employment in the area the week befire the census

Daytime/workday population

England and Wales (Workday Population)
Workday population is where the usually resident population is re-distributed to their places of work, while those not in work are recorded at their usual residence.
The workday population of an area is defined as all usual residents aged 16 and above who are in employment and whose workplace is in the area, and all other usual residents of any age who are not in employment but are resident in the area. People who work mainly at or from home or do not have a fixed place of work are included in their area of their usual residence. The following population groups are excluded from the workday population of an area:

  • Those living in England and Wales but working in Scotland, Northern Ireland, outside the UK or on offshore installations,
  • Those with a place of work in England and Wales but who are not usually resident in England and Wales, and
  • Short-term residents

England and Wales (Workplace Population)
Workplace population is where the usually resident population is re-distributed to their main place of work, but those not working are excluded.

Means of travel to place of work (2001 specifications)
This dataset provides 2011 Census estimates that classify the workday population aged 16 to 74 in England and Wales by method of travel to work. The estimates are as at census day, 27 March 2011.
The information in datasets that use the 2001 specifications of 'Travel to Work' is produced using both a person's place of work and their method of travel to work and is comparable with 2001.
For example, a person who has indicated their place of work as their home address and said that they travel to work by driving a car or van (e.g. visiting clients) appears in the category 'Works mainly at or from home', as was the case in 2001.

Place of usual residence
For the 2011 Census, a person's place of usual residence is generally the address in the UK at which they spend the majority of time. For most people this means their permanent or family home.
The census counted someone as usually resident at their permanent or family home if, on 27 March 2011:

  • They were temporarily away from home, for example on holiday, visiting friends or relatives or travelling (unless outside of the UK for 12 months or more)
  • They were in a communal establishment such as a care home, hospital or similar establishment for less than six months
  • They were a baby born on or before 27 March 2011, even if still in hospital
  • They had more than one UK address and were staying at the second address on census night.

In addition to people present at their permanent or family home, the 2011 Census counted someone as usually resident at an address if on 27 March 2011, they were a usual resident of the UK and present at an address on census night (even if only for one night) and had no other usual address in the UK.

Someone was not counted as usually resident at an address if, on 27 March 2011:

  • The address at which they were staying was not their usual address and they usually lived elsewhere in the UK (these people were counted as visitors to the address)
  • They were away from their home address and had been staying or were expecting to stay in a communal establishment such as a care home or hospital for six months or more (these people were enumerated as usually resident at the communal establishment).

Further clarification is applicable to the definition of place of usual residence certain population sub-groups:

  • Students and schoolchildren in full-time education studying away from the family home were counted as usually resident at their term-time address. Basic demographic information only (name, sex, age, marital status and relationship) was collected at their non-term-time ('home' or vacation) address.
  • Armed forces personnel were counted as usually resident at their permanent or family home even if the majority of their time was spent at their 'working' address. Additionally, the following clarification applies to armed forces personnel with specific circumstances:

    • A member of the armed forces on deployment on operations was included at their permanent or family address regardless of length of deployment
    • A member of the armed forces with no permanent or family address at which they were usually resident was recorded as usually resident at their base address
    • If the permanent (stationed) base was abroad, e.g. Germany or Cyprus, then the armed forces member was not included in the census count
    • A member of the armed forces serving on a ship inside UK waters on 27 March 2011 was counted as usually resident at their family/permanent home or resident on the ship if they did not have a family/permanent home
    • A member of the armed forces serving on a ship outside UK waters on 27 March 2011 was counted as usually resident at their family permanent home or home port/naval base address if they did not have a family/permanent home.
  • Additionally, Armed Forces personnel from overseas forces based in the UK for three months or longer were counted as usually resident in the UK at their UK permanent or family home/base address.

People with a second address, for example those working away from home and other people with two or more addresses, were counted as usually resident at their permanent or family home even if the majority of their time is spent at another address. This includes people who spent time at a second address outside of the UK, but only if they intended to remain outside the UK for less than 12 months in total (except armed forces deployed on operations).
Children with parents who live apart and spend part of their time living with each parent were advised to be counted as usually resident at the address at which the child spent the majority of their time. If the child spent time equally living with each parent then they were advised to be counted as usually resident at the address where they were staying overnight on 27 March 2011.

For people living in communal establishments who had already spent or expected to spend six months or more in a communal establishment, for example, a care home, hospital or hostel, their place of usual residence was that communal establishment. Otherwise their place of usual residence was at their UK home address and the person was classified as a visitor to the communal establishment.

Place of usual residence for people in prison applies to sentenced prisoners in a similar way as others in communal establishments, based upon the length of their sentence. This means that:

  • If they were convicted with a sentence of six months or more then they were counted as usually resident in the prison
  • If they were convicted with a sentence of less than six months then they were counted as usually resident at their permanent or family home and as a visitor to the prison
  • If they were on remand then they were counted as usually resident at their permanent or family home, and as a visitor to the prison, irrespective of how long they were in prison on remand
Units: 
FieldValue
Publisher
Modified Date
2018-02-08
Release Date
2018-02-08
Frequency
Decennial
Identifier
e6b1f730-c153-4aa1-93dd-840906c19fa2
Geographical Coverage Location
England and Wales
Licence
UK Open Government Licence (OGL)
Granularity
Country level down to Workplace Zones
Public Access Level
Public
Year: 
Citation: 
Office for National Statistics; National Records of Scotland; Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency; UK Data Service. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5257/census/aggregate-2011-2